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Arch Linux Command Line Linux Raspberry Pi Ubuntu

Setting up a static external IP address on a Raspberry Pi (For Free!)

If you’re planning on setting up your raspberry pi as a server or a project that’ll want you to access it from a static external IP address, here’s a really simple and quick way to get that up and running for free.

First off, this guide uses the free service from no-ip (www.no-ip.com), so you’ll want to head over there and register for that. (http://www.no-ip.com/newUser.php)

Done? Ok, great. Next you’ll want to create a new host, this can be found under the “Hosts/Redirects” page (this link should work if you’re logged in: https://www.no-ip.com/members/dns/)

Click “Add a Host”

Enter a name and choose one of the free domains from the drop down box (alternatively you are able to use an existing domain name or sub-domain if you have one.) There are some other settings, if you know what you’re doing go ahead and choose which you prefer but from those who just want to get this set up you can now click “Create Host” and you’re done.

Now, in order for this system to know what your pi’s current address is in order to assign it that domain address you need to install the client on the pi (thankfully, they have a Linux one!).

Download the latest version of their client – http://www.no-ip.com/downloads.php?page=linux

tar -zxvf noip-duc-linux.tar.gz
make
sudo make install

One there, you’ll be promted for your email and password for no-ip.com.
It will then show you have a host registered, just hit enter.
Then it will ask to update the host you made on the site “Do you wish to have host [somedescriptivename.no-ip.org] updated?[N] (y/N)”. Type “Y” then hit enter.
It’ll ask for an update interval, this can be left at 30.
Then it’ll ask if you want to “run something on successful update”, basically this allows a script to run if it gets a connection. Choose N and hit return.

That’s it, you should be done. Just test out the connection via SSH or ping and compare the IPs.

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Arch Linux Fedora HowTo Linux Posts Ubuntu

Setting Up Surround Sound in Linux

It’s been a while since I bothered, the reason being it’s always seemed like an un-worthwhile struggle to get it working but either things changed or I was doing something to overcomplicate the process but it’s actually pretty simple to get surround sound up and running on your Linux machine. Now, I’m not going to go in to how to install the drivers for your specific sound card, because there are so many and I don’t have them all and most times on most popular distributions (Debian, Ubuntu, Mint, Fedora, OpenSuse etc) you’re going to notice that the sound card is actually already supported. What I will be doing is showing you how easy it was to get my 5.1’s set up (and the same will be said for 7.1’s).

Step 1:

First off you’re going to want to edit the pulseaudio configuration file to add the number of speakers you’re using, it’s default is set to 2.

sudo gedit /etc/pulse/daemon.conf

Near the bottom of the file, there will be a line which looks like this:

;default-sample-channels = 2

The semi-colon is a comment, so this line isn’t actually doing anything unless you remove that. I would suggest leaving that line alone and adding a new line at the bottom:

default-sample-channels = 6

If you’re using 5.1’s the number of channels will be 6, 7.1’s will be 8 and I think you get where I’m going with this? So in this example, I’m using 5.1’s.

Now save and close that file. You’ll need to reboot your system now too, so that these changes will take effect.

Step 2:

So you’re back? Good..

Now you’re going to want to open up the Sound Preferences, usually you can do this by clicking on the little sound icon in your panel, or System > Preference > Sounds from the menu.

From here, you’ll want to click on the Hardware tab. Near the bottom it’ll say Profile: with a drop down box next to it. Here you can select the type of set up you have, as you can see in the screenshot I have an “Analogue Surround 5.1 Output”, yours might be different and that’s cool and if you don’t know feel free to try a few out. Next to that drop down box is a button which says “Test Speakers”, this didn’t work for me so I have to use an online test but give it a try as it might work!

That’s it, you should be done!

Categories
Fedora HowTo Posts

Fedora 15 Post Installation Guide

Install RPM Fusion

su -c 'yum localinstall --nogpgcheck http://download1.rpmfusion.org/free/fedora/rpmfusion-free-release-stable.noarch.rpm http://download1.rpmfusion.org/nonfree/fedora/rpmfusion-nonfree-release-stable.noarch.rpm'

http://rpmfusion.org/Configuration

Enable unsupported video and audio codecs

Get enhanced audio and video support in applications that rely on GStreamer:

sudo yum install gstreamer-plugins-ugly gstreamer-plugins-bad gstreamer-ffmpeg

Get enhanced audio and video support in applications that rely on xine backend:

sudo yum install xine-lib-extras-freeworld

http://rpmfusion.org/FAQ

Install Chromium Browser

Make a file called “fedora-chromium-stable.repo” in /etc/yum.repos.d/ and open:

sudo gedit /etc/yum.repos.d/fedora-chromium-stable.repo

Paste in the following, save and exit:

# Place this file in your /etc/yum.repos.d/ directory

[fedora-chromium-stable]
name=Builds of the "stable" tag of the Chromium Web Browser
baseurl=http://repos.fedorapeople.org/repos/spot/chromium-stable/fedora-$releasever/$basearch/
enabled=1
skip_if_unavailable=1
gpgcheck=0

[fedora-chromium-stable-source]
name=Builds of the "stable" tag of the Chromium Web Browser - Source
baseurl=http://repos.fedorapeople.org/repos/spot/chromium-stable/fedora-$releasever/SRPMS
enabled=0
skip_if_unavailable=1
gpgcheck=0

http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Chromium

Install Flash

Download the YUM for Linux version from the adobe site – http://get.adobe.com/flashplayer/

Run the following in the folder you downloaded the file to:

su -c 'rpm -ivh adobe-release-i386-1.0-1.noarch.rpm'

Import the GPG key:

su -c 'rpm --import /etc/pki/rpm-gpg/RPM-GPG-KEY-adobe-linux'

In 32bit run:

su -c 'yum install nspluginwrapper alsa-plugins-pulseaudio flash-plugin'

on 64bit run:

su -c 'yum install nspluginwrapper.{x86_64,i686} alsa-plugins-pulseaudio.i686 --disablerepo=adobe-linux-i386'
su -c 'yum install flash-plugin'

If you’re using Firefox, that should be all done but if you’re using Chromium you’ll need to open Firefox and play a video then close it and run the following:

32bit:

sudo ln -s /usr/lib/mozilla/plugins/libflashplayer.so /usr/lib/chromium-browser/plugins/libflashplayer.so

64bit:

sudo ln -s /usr/lib64/mozilla/plugins-wrapped/nswrapper_32_64.libflashplayer.so /usr/lib64/chromium-browser/plugins/nswrapper_32_64.libflashplayer.so

Close and re-open Chromium and head to YouTube to check that it’s working.

http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Flash

Install Dropbox

Download and install the correct rpm for 32 or 64 bit from the Dropbox website – http://www.dropbox.com/downloading.

Follow this guide to remove the YUM errors you may encounter once the package is installed – http://alexsleat.co.uk/2011/05/24/how-to-fix-error-cannot-retrieve-repository-metadata-repomd-xml-for-repository-dropbox-please-verify-its-path-and-try-again/ .

Install VLC

sudo yum install vlc