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C/C++ Command Line Linux Programming Ubuntu

fatal error: curl/curl.h: No such file or directory | Ubuntu 12.04

fatal error: curl/curl.h: No such file or directory

If you’re missing the curl/curl.h header file, chances are you’re just missing the correct dev package file for the curl library.

sudo apt-get install libcurl4-gnutls-dev

That should fix it.

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Command Line Linux Ubuntu

Ubuntu 12.04 – Removing conflicting operating system files…

If you’re trying out the latest version of Ubuntu, 12.04 or Precise Pangolin and you want to keep your old /home partition, chances are you’ve come across the installation hanging on a process “Removing conflicting operating system files…”. No worries, this seems to be a common bug and there’s a pretty easy work around.

Continue with the installation, without asking for the /home partition to be mounted. Only set the root partition (/) and your swap space.

Once the installation is complete, reboot and load it up.

Now, you’ll want to find the partition that /home is mounted under, this will likely be /dev/sdxN, where x is the drive letter and N is the partition number (i.e mine is located under /dev/sda5).

If you’re unsure, you can list the possible drives using the following command:

ls /dev/ | grep sd

And then you can mount each drive under in a temp directory and check what’s in there:

mkdir temp
mount /dev/sda1 temp

Once you know which partition you want, it’s time to edit your /etc/fstab/

sudo gedit /etc/fstab

For those who don’t go digging around in the config files of linux, this may look pretty daunting, but it isn’t. All you really need to do is add a new line to mount your home partition. Here’s mine:

/dev/sda5	/home/		ext4	defaults	1	2

The first part is the partition that’s being used, next what the partition is. Next is the file system type. Followed by default options and then the dump and pass values.

Once you’ve saved this file with the appended line, reboot your system. Now you should find your old home partition is mounted normally and you can get on with your install.

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Command Line Linux Ubuntu

Ubuntu 12.04 – Moving The Windows Buttons Back To The Right.

Those pesky windows buttons (maximise, minimise and close) default to the left of the menu bar after a new Ubuntu installations, and it’s been happening since 10.04. Most people, like myself, are stuck in our ways and just want them back where they belong. It’s pretty easy to do this, just open up a terminal (ctrl+alt+t) and copy in the following:

gconftool -s /apps/metacity/general/button_layout -t string menu:minimize,maximize,close

Once you hit enter, you should see the buttons return to their rightful place on the right, also in the right order.

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Featured Linux Ubuntu

Toggle Touchpad With Keyboard Shortcut in Ubuntu

Install Jupiter

Instructions for Ubuntu 11.10, 11.04, 10.10, 10.04: http://www.webupd8.org/2011/09/jupiter-applet-finally-available-for.html

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:webupd8team/jupiter 
sudo apt-get update 
sudo apt-get install jupiter

Jupiter comes with a useful script to disable and re-enable the touchpad/track pad, it can be ran using the following command:

sudo /usr/lib/jupiter/scripts/touchpad

Now all you’ll need to do is add this command to a keyboard shortcut, below are instructions for several desktop environments.


In xfce:

Applications > Settings > Settings Manager

Click Keyboard

Click on the “Applications Shortcuts” tab.

Click Add:

Here you will be promped with a new window asking for the command you wish to run, enter the following:

sudo /usr/lib/jupiter/scripts/touchpad

Click OK and it will now ask for a keyboard shortcut. Simply press the key combination you want to assign to disabling the touchpad (for example, I used Alt+F1) the keys you’re pressing will show up and the window will close.

You’ll now see the command and shortcut in the list and you can now press that key combo to disable the trackpad and press it again to re-enable it.


In Gnome:

In Unity:

bish bash bosh.

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Linux Ubuntu

AL lib: pulseaudio.c:331: PulseAudio returned minreq > tlength/2; expect break up – Ubuntu 11.10

./blender
connect failed: No such file or directory
ndof: spacenavd not found
AL lib: pulseaudio.c:331: PulseAudio returned minreq > tlength/2; expect break up
Floating point exception

Download and install the associated package to your processor from here : https://launchpad.net/ubuntu/oneiric/+package/python-openal

Restart your computer and the issue should now be resolved.

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HowTo Linux Ubuntu

Updating The Kernel in Ubuntu

Download the latest from here:

http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/

The folders correspond to kernel versions and should also include the ubuntu version, for example I chose to update 11.10 (oneiric) from “3.0.0-14-generic” to “3.1.4”, this was in a directory called “v3.1.4-oneiric/“.

You’ll need 3 files (replace * with the kernel version you’ve downloaded):

linux-headers-*_all.deb

For 64 bit systems (replace * with the kernel version you’ve downloaded):

linux-headers-*_amd64.deb
linux-image-*_amd64.deb

For 32 bit systems (replace * with the kernel version you’ve downloaded):

linux-headers-*_i386.deb
linux-image-*_i386.deb

Once you have the files, install them in the following order using these commands (of course, replacing the version number for the ones you’ve downloaded):
sudo dpkg -U linux-headers-3.1.4-030104_3.1.4-030104.201111281851_all.deb
sudo dpkg -U linux-headers-3.1.4-030104-generic_3.1.4-030104.201111281851_amd64.deb
sudo dpkg -U linux-image-3.1.4-030104-generic_3.1.4-030104.201111281851_amd64.deb

Once that’s done, reboot. Once you’re back use the following command to check that the kernel you’re using is the one you’ve just downloaded and installed!

uname -r
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Arch Linux Fedora HowTo Linux Posts Ubuntu

Setting Up Surround Sound in Linux

It’s been a while since I bothered, the reason being it’s always seemed like an un-worthwhile struggle to get it working but either things changed or I was doing something to overcomplicate the process but it’s actually pretty simple to get surround sound up and running on your Linux machine. Now, I’m not going to go in to how to install the drivers for your specific sound card, because there are so many and I don’t have them all and most times on most popular distributions (Debian, Ubuntu, Mint, Fedora, OpenSuse etc) you’re going to notice that the sound card is actually already supported. What I will be doing is showing you how easy it was to get my 5.1’s set up (and the same will be said for 7.1’s).

Step 1:

First off you’re going to want to edit the pulseaudio configuration file to add the number of speakers you’re using, it’s default is set to 2.

sudo gedit /etc/pulse/daemon.conf

Near the bottom of the file, there will be a line which looks like this:

;default-sample-channels = 2

The semi-colon is a comment, so this line isn’t actually doing anything unless you remove that. I would suggest leaving that line alone and adding a new line at the bottom:

default-sample-channels = 6

If you’re using 5.1’s the number of channels will be 6, 7.1’s will be 8 and I think you get where I’m going with this? So in this example, I’m using 5.1’s.

Now save and close that file. You’ll need to reboot your system now too, so that these changes will take effect.

Step 2:

So you’re back? Good..

Now you’re going to want to open up the Sound Preferences, usually you can do this by clicking on the little sound icon in your panel, or System > Preference > Sounds from the menu.

From here, you’ll want to click on the Hardware tab. Near the bottom it’ll say Profile: with a drop down box next to it. Here you can select the type of set up you have, as you can see in the screenshot I have an “Analogue Surround 5.1 Output”, yours might be different and that’s cool and if you don’t know feel free to try a few out. Next to that drop down box is a button which says “Test Speakers”, this didn’t work for me so I have to use an online test but give it a try as it might work!

That’s it, you should be done!

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Linux Posts Ubuntu

OpenNI – error CS0006: cannot find metadata file `System.Windows.Forms.dll’

During installing the OpenNi kinect drivers, found here: https://github.com/OpenNI/OpenNI, I came across this error:

make[1]: Entering directory `/home/alex/kinect/OpenNI/Platform/Linux-x86/Build/Samples/SimpleViewer.net’
gmcs -out:../../../Bin/Release/SimpleViewer.net.exe -target:winexe -unsafe -o+ -r:OpenNI.net.dll -r:System.Windows.Forms.dll -r:System.Drawing.dll -lib:../../../Bin/Release ../../../../../Samples/SimpleViewer.net/*.cs ../../Res/AssemblyInfo-OpenNI.cs
error CS0006: cannot find metadata file `System.Windows.Forms.dll’
Compilation failed: 1 error(s), 0 warnings
make[1]: *** [../../../Bin/Release/SimpleViewer.net.exe] Error 1
make[1]: Leaving directory `/home/alex/kinect/OpenNI/Platform/Linux-x86/Build/Samples/SimpleViewer.net’
make: *** [Samples/SimpleViewer.net] Error 2

To fix it, simply install the following package:

sudo apt-get install mono-complete

Once finished, re-make and make install and everything should be dandy!

Categories
Linux Posts Ubuntu

Java – .jar Error 127 /bin/sh: javac: not found.

If you’re getting a similar error to this while trying to compile java files (.jar) then you’re probably missing the jdk, in ubuntu it’s called “sun-java6-jdk” so just go ahead and install that and all should be good!

make[1]: Entering directory `/home/alex/kinect/OpenNI/Platform/Linux-x86/Build/Wrappers/OpenNI.java’
javac -d Release ../../../../../Wrappers/OpenNI.java/src/org/OpenNI/*.java
/bin/sh: javac: not found
make[1]: *** [../../../Bin/Release/org.OpenNI.jar] Error 127
make[1]: Leaving directory `/home/alex/kinect/OpenNI/Platform/Linux-x86/Build/Wrappers/OpenNI.java’
make: *** [Wrappers/OpenNI.java] Error 2

FIX:

sudo apt-get install sun-java6-jdk
Categories
Android Posts

How To Take Screenshots in Ice Cream Sandwich (Android 4.0.x)

Android 4.0 or Ice Cream Sandwich (ICS) finally brings screenshots natively to the mobile platform, to a lot of users of custom ROMs such as CyanogenMod or Darkys ROM it may seem like this has been a feature for a while but that isn’t the case.

To take a screenshot:
  • Simply hold down the Volume Down button and Power button for about a second.

 

You’ll see a flash and the screen will be framed which shows the screenshot was taken (I’ve tried grabbing a screenshot of this screen, but it’s pretty tricky and no luck yet!). The screenshot will be saved in a folder /Pictures/Screenshots on your phones internal SD card.

You’ll also get a new notification in the notification bar saying “Saving Screenshot…” and once it’s done there’ll be a “Screenshot captured.” notification in the pull down menu which will take you directly the screenshot in the Gallery.

For more screenshots, check out my first look and impressions post about ICS!
 HERE